Navid Afkari: International Olympic Committee ‘shocked’ by execution of Iranian wrestler

Kindly Share This Story:
Navid Afkari
Navid Afkari

The International Olympic Committee said it was “shocked” by Saturday’s execution of a young Iranian wrestler over the murder of a public sector worker during anti-government protests in 2018.

Navid Afkari was executed at a prison in the southern Iranian city of Shiraz, something the IOC said was “very sad news”.

“The IOC is shocked by this announcement today,” it added.

Iran said it executed a young wrestler Saturday over the murder of a public sector worker during anti-government protests in 2018, despite international and social media calls for his release.

Navid Afkari was executed in the morning at a prison in the southern city of Shiraz, provincial prosecutor general Kazem Mousavi was quoted as saying on state television’s website.

The 27-year-old had been found guilty of “voluntary homicide” for stabbing to death Hossein Torkman, a water department worker, on August 2, 2018, according to the judiciary.

Shiraz and several other urban centres across the Islamic republic had been the scene that day of anti-government protests and demonstrations over economic and social hardship.

Reports published abroad say Afkari was condemned on the basis of confessions aired on television after being extracted under torture, prompting online campaigns of support for his release.

London-based rights group Amnesty International has repeatedly called on Iran to stop broadcasting videos of “confessions” by suspects, saying they “violate the defendants’ rights”.

The judiciary’s Mizan Online news agency denied the accusations.

According to Amnesty, Afkari’s last contact with his family was a short phone call on September 6.

His two brothers Vahid and Habib are still detained at the same prison as him, the group said in a statement.

The sentence had been carried out at “the insistence of the victim’s family”, said Mousavi, the prosecutor general for Fars province.

Afkari’s lawyer, Hassan Younessi, said on Twitter that a number of people in Shiraz were to meet with the slain worker’s family on Sunday to ask for their forgiveness.

He also said that based on criminal law in Iran “the convict has a right to meet his family before the execution.”

“Were you in such a hurry to carry out the sentence that you deprived Navid of his last visit?”

VANGUARD

Kindly Share This Story:
Comments

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar